Posts

Mel and Stef take a closer look at our last four interviews, drawing connections and painting a picture of the future based on key nuggets from past episodes.

With the birth of decentralized platforms, like block-chain, we’re seeing new possibilities open up for people, not just in world of crypto-currency, but as a way to securely share data and knowledge of all kinds. In this episode, we’re speaking with Michel Bauwens, a Belgian researcher and founder of the Peer-to-Peer foundation. His work focuses on the capacity of peer-to-peer theory to enable the growth of our knowledge commons and foster a more distributed, equitable, and ecological society.

Industrial agriculture has led to deforestation, land degradation, and biodiversity loss around the world. In this episode, we’re speaking with Festus Kiplagat, an expert in agroforestry and the founder of Green Planet Initiative 2050 in Kenya, who is working to reinstitute indigenous farming practices that can restore the land.

In our relatively short existence as a species, the human race has had a dramatic impact on the Earth. But what if human society could emulate and collaborate with nature rather than trying to dominate it? In this episode, we’re speaking with Dayna Baumeister, a partner at Biomimicry 3.8 and director of the Biomimicry Center at Arizona State University. Dayna’s work is all about how we as humanity can learn from the millions of other species on the planet to improve our lives and live in greater harmony with nature.

If the entire history of the planet Earth were a novel, readers of the book who got to our current chapter might start worrying about the possibility of an unhappy ending. Luckily for us, that story is not completely written yet, which means we have a say how it goes. In this episode, we speak with Mary Alice Arthur, a story activist who empowers people and organizations through storytelling to create positive systemic shifts.

How can we mobilize people en masse to act on behalf to the environment? Maybe it’s through song and dance. In this episode, we speak with Kofi Debrah, co-founder of Oko Forest and one of the producers of the Asa Baako music festival in Ghana, where change makers can come together to ‘party with purpose’. Listen as we talk agroforestry, neocolonialism, and the power of culture and creativity to make a positive impact on the planet.

Extinction Rebellion is a global movement to get the world’s governments to address the climate and ecological emergency. What started in the UK in 2018 has now grown to include 1145 groups in 72 countries around the world. In this episode, we speak with Christina See, a core organizer in New York, to learn more about how this movement has brought in so many people from such a wide array of backgrounds and what it will take to save ourselves from extinction.

Until destructive fossil fuel extraction practices are ended, until the rights of nature are restored, until the world comes together to face the climate crisis, we will not stop fighting. That’s Nnimmo Bassey’s message to the world. Nnimmo is an environmental and human rights activist working out of Nigeria. He has been involved with countless environmental advocacy groups, including Friends of the Earth International, Environmental Rights Action, and the Health of Mother Earth Foundation. In this episode, he shares his vision of a world that dances to a new beat.

What if we could turn back the clock on climate change? True Carbon, a start-up founded by Sebastian and Lars Graf, is trying to do just that. By creating a marketplace to incentivize the use of ‘carbon negative’ farming techniques, True Carbon could lead the way in storing greenhouse gases in the Earth’s topsoil and reversing the damage we’ve done to our atmosphere.

Joseph Bonasia and Gary Robbins have a unique approach to protecting our environment: they are working to secure legal rights for rivers and other bodies of water in Florida.  Securing the “rights of nature” would give citizens and municipalities the authority to sue polluters on behalf of natural resources and the people who share them. Joe and Gary emphasize that as humans, we are not separate from nature, but an interdependent part of global ecosystems. They want our legal system to reflect that interdependence.

What if you could pick up a book and learn how to transform your entire community in a single hour? That’s what Faye Cox is working on with her startup called Hourbooks. She’s on a mission to empower people to live more inclusive, resilient, and sustainable lifestyles. Hourbooks is the gateway.

Gwendolyn Hallsmith, founder of the Headwaters Garden and Learning Center ecovillage, talks about how our money system has gotten out of balance and what it will take to get our world back on track. Bonus: she sings!

What will it take to make air pollution a thing of the past? According to Kristian Lande, it’s all about decentralizing data. His start up, AirVeraCity, aims to give people direct access to the information they need to take local action on air quality.

Declan Kennedy is one of the early founders of the Global Ecovillage Network, empowering communities to grow in harmony with nature.

Mel and Steff interview Clarissa da Costa, an expert in infectious diseases, and Xinjing Jiang, a student from Wuhan, to discuss the potential fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic.